Tightrope Walkers

1895, “The Tightrope Walker” by Jean-Louis Forain (1852-1931)

tight·rope (tītʹrōp´) noun 1. A tightly stretched rope, usually of wire, on which acrobats perform high above the ground. 2. An extremely precarious course or situation.  “I am always at the beginning,” said The Buddha, on being asked what life was like. Hello 2015. Here we are: at the beginning again. Accidental acrobats. On this tightrope twined… Continue reading Tightrope Walkers

“Wanna see a picture of my baby that died?” she said.

Life had different plans The day before yesterday (Thursday, May 1, 2014), I had plans to hit the month running, or at least walking. Post the first entry in the new series I’ve been working on. And then meditate—for at least ten minutes (a day)—a personal goal I’ve set for this May. Neither happened though. This day, life had different plans in… Continue reading “Wanna see a picture of my baby that died?” she said.

Boys laughing

Poem #14: “Two”

Tufts of hair,
Freckled noses,
Full cheeks
Below thick dark lashes
Body motions
Residue and remnants 

I have two sons
One in this world and
One in that world
Two pirates
Two feathers in my pocket
To shape my heart with

We use the words widowwidower, and orphan, but there is no word in our vocabulary that identifies the bereaved parent.

So I’ve coined the term willower.

will·ow·er (wĭlʹō-ər) noun

a. A bereaved parent.  b. A person whose child, or children, has died. c. A person that willows, or grieves the death of their child, or children: Each willower processes grief in his or her own way, in his or her own time.

[From the words willow, a weeping tree that has come to symbolize deep mourning, and power, the strength of will to carry on—despite loss.]